Tuesday, 20 February 2024 00:00

Arthritis in the toe, a common ailment affecting many individuals, manifests through various symptoms that can significantly impact daily life. Persistent toe pain, particularly during movement or weight-bearing activities, are hallmark symptoms of toe arthritis. Individuals may experience stiffness and limited range of motion in the affected toe, making tasks like walking, bending, and standing challenging and painful. Swelling and inflammation surrounding the toe joint are also common symptoms of arthritis, indicating underlying joint damage and inflammation. As arthritis progresses, individuals may notice changes in the appearance and alignment of the toe, such as swelling, deformities, and bone spurs. Additionally, toe arthritis can cause instability and weakness in the affected joint, leading to difficulty bearing weight and maintaining balance. If you are experiencing toe pain, it is strongly suggested that you consult a podiatrist who can diagnose the cause, and offer appropriate relief and treatment options.

Toe pain can disrupt your daily activities. If you have any concerns, contact Tanisha Richmond, DPM of Richmond Foot & Ankle, LLC. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Causes Toe Pain?

Most severe toe pain is caused due to a sports injury, trauma from dropping something heavy on the toe, or bumping into something rigid. Other problems can develop over time for various reasons.

Toe pain can be caused by one or more ailments. The most common include:

  • Trauma
  • Sports injury
  • Wearing shoes that are too tight
  • Arthritis
  • Gout
  • Corns and calluses
  • Hammertoe
  • Bunions
  • Blisters
  • Ingrown toenails
  • Sprains
  • Fractures (broken bones)
  • Dislocations

When to See a Podiatrist

  • Severe pain
  • Persistent pain that lasts more than a week
  • Signs of infection
  • Continued swelling
  • Pain that prevents walking

Diagnosis

In many cases the cause of toe pain is obvious, but in others, a podiatrist may want to use more advanced methods to determine the problem. These can range from simple visual inspections and sensation tests to X-rays and MRI scans. Prior medical history, family medical history, and any recent physical traumatic events will all be taken into consideration for a proper diagnosis.

Treatment

Treatments for toe pain and injuries vary and may include shoe inserts, padding, taping, medicines, injections, and in some cases, surgery. If you believe that you have broken a toe, please see a podiatrist as soon as possible.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Dayton, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Toe Pain
Monday, 19 February 2024 00:00

Gout is a painful, inflammatory form of arthritis. Those affected will typically feel an intense stiffness in the joints of their feet, particularly in the big toe. Schedule a visit to learn about how gout can be managed and treated.

Tuesday, 13 February 2024 00:00

Peripheral artery disease, or PAD, can cause crampy, painful sensations in the legs during walking, often dismissed as mere exertion or aging. However, it is important not to overlook these symptoms, as PAD stems from fatty deposits that obstruct blood flow in the arteries outside the heart and brain. The lack of blood flow to the lower extremities can result in serious foot problems. Risk factors of peripheral artery disease include smoking, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and diabetes. Classic PAD pain, known as claudication, typically occurs in the calf and subsides with rest. But other signs, like coldness, discoloration, or slow-healing sores in the feet may indicate inadequate blood supply, necessitating prompt treatment. Early detection via tests like the ankle-brachial index is vital, with lifestyle changes, such as quitting smoking, maintaining a healthy diet, and regular exercise, playing a key role in PAD management. Walking enhances blood flow in smaller leg arteries, creating alternative pathways to alleviate pain. Health experts recommend at least 30 minutes of walking, three times a week, for individuals with peripheral artery disease, to help slow the progression and associated complications. For help with the foot problems linked to PAD, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist as quickly as possible.

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with Tanisha Richmond, DPM from Richmond Foot & Ankle, LLC. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heal
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Dayton, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Peripheral Artery Disease
Tuesday, 06 February 2024 00:00

Jobs that require prolonged standing and walking often lead to complaints of foot and ankle pain among employees. Various factors contribute to foot and ankle pain in assembly line work, including time spent standing, walking, or sitting. Additionally, floor surface characteristics, weight, BMI, age, foot biomechanics, and demographic and medical history may significantly contribute to developing foot and ankle pain. Increased risk factors can include high metatarsal pressure during gait assessment, extended periods of walking, female gender, job dissatisfaction, and a history of conditions like rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, or vascular disorders. Truck and forklift drivers who frequently exit and enter their vehicles tend to have a higher prevalence of ankle and foot problems. Prevention includes the use of shoe orthotics with medial longitudinal arch and metatarsal pad support. The incorporation of sit and stand work stations are also options to mitigate foot and ankle issues in these types of environments. If you are involved in assembly line work and experience foot or ankle pain, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist for an exam and treatment that can help relieve pain.

Foot and ankle trauma is common among athletes and the elderly. If you have concerns that you may have experienced trauma to the foot and ankle, consult with Tanisha Richmond, DPM from Richmond Foot & Ankle, LLC. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Foot and ankle trauma cover a range of injuries all over the foot; common injuries include:

  • Broken bones
  • Muscle strains
  • Injuries to the tendons and ligaments
  • Stress fractures

Symptoms

Symptoms of foot and ankle injuries vary depending on the injury, but more common ones include:

  • Bruising
  • Inflammation/ Swelling
  • Pain

Diagnosis

To properly diagnose the exact type of injury, podiatrists will conduct a number of different tests. Some of these include sensation and visual tests, X-rays, and MRIs. Medical and family histories will also be taken into account.

Treatment

Once the injury has been diagnosed, the podiatrist can than offer the best treatment options for you. In less severe cases, rest and keeping pressure off the foot may be all that’s necessary. Orthotics, such as a specially made shoes, or immobilization devices, like splints or casts, may be deemed necessary. Finally, if the injury is severe enough, surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Dayton, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Foot and Ankle Fractures

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